OPENING HOURS - MON/TUES/WED/THURS 9.30am - 5.30pm | FRI/SAT 9.00am - 5.30pm | SUN 11.00am - 5.00pm

Music Search

Mort Garson - Mother Earth’s Plantasis


CD: £12.99

Label: Sacred Bones

Release date: 21.06.2019

LP: £23.99

Label: Sacred Bones

Release date: 21.06.2019

Format Info: Green Vinyl

Further Information


In the mid-1970s, a force of nature swept across the continental United States, cutting across all strata of race and class, rooting in our minds, our homes, our culture. It wasn’t The Exorcist, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, or even bell-bottoms, but instead a book called The Secret Life of Plants. The work of occultist/former OSS agent Peter Tompkins and former CIA agent/dowsing enthusiast Christopher Bird, the books shot up the bestseller charts and spread like kudzu across the landscape, becoming a phenomenon. Seemingly overnight, the indoor plant business was in full bloom and photosynthetic eukaryotes of every genus were hanging off walls, lording over bookshelves, and basking on sunny window ledges. The science behind Secret Life was specious: plants can hear our prayers, they’re lie detectors, they’re telepathic, able to predict natural disasters and receive signals from distant galaxies. But that didn’t stop millions from buying and nurturing their new plants. Perhaps the craziest claim of the book was that plants also dug music. And whether you purchased a snake plant, asparagus fern, peace lily, or what have you from Mother Earth on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles (or bought a Simmons mattress from Sears), you also took home Plantasia, an album recorded especially for them. Subtitled “warm earth music for plants…and the people that love them,” it was full of bucolic, charming, stoner-friendly, decidedly unscientific tunes enacted on the new-fangled device called the Moog. Plants date back from the dawn of time, but apparently they loved the Moog, never mind that the synthesizer had been on the market for just a few years. Most of all, the plants loved the ditties made by composer Mort Garson. Few characters in early electronic music can be both fearless pioneers and cheesy trend-chasers, but Garson embraced both extremes, and has been unheralded as a result. When one writer rhetorically asked: “How was Garson’s music so ubiquitous while the man remained so under the radar?” the answer was simple. Well before Brian Eno did it, Garson was making discreet music, both the man and his music as inconspicuous as a Chlorophytum comosum. Julliard-educated and active as a session player in the post-war era, Garson wrote lounge hits, scored plush arrangements for Doris Day, and garlanded weeping countrypolitan strings around Glen Campbell’s “By the Time I Get to Phoenix.” He could render the Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel alike into easy listening and also dreamed up his own ditties. “An idear” as Garson himself would drawl it out. “I live with it, I walk it, I sing it.” But as his daughter Day Darmet recalls: “When my dad found the synthesizer, he realized he didn’t want to do pop music anymore.” Garson encountered Robert Moog and his new device at the Audio Engineering Society’s West Coast convention in 1967 and immediately began tinkering with the device. With the Moog, those idears could be transformed. “He constantly had a song he was humming,” Darmet says. “At the table he was constantly tapping.” Which is to say that Mort pulled his melodies out of thin air, just like any household plant would.

Staff Reviews


Such a sweet and bizarre concept for the plant lover in your life! New age synth-y sugar that'll have your plants in ecstacy.

By Adam Gillison

Track Listing


(A)

1. Plantasia (3:23)

2. Symphony for a Spider Plant (2:41)

3. Baby’s Tears Blues (3:03)

4. Ode to an African Violet (4:04)

5. Concerto For Philodendron And Pothos (3:09)

(B)

1. Rhapsody In Green (3:28)

2. Swingin' Spathiphyllums (2:59)

3. You Don't Have To Walk A Begonia (2:31)

4. A Mellow Mood For Maidenhair (2:17)

5. Music To Soothe The Savage Snake Plant (3:23)

News

Events

Want to receive all the latest News from Jumbo straight to your inbox